Unveiling the Ecological Ramifications of Aerial Pesticide Application by Drones on Soil Microbiota in Rice

Sreenath Ragiman *

Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Hyderabad, India.

Kiran Babu Talluri

Institute of Rice Research, Agricultural Research Institute, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Hyderabad -500030, India.

Varma NRG

Institute of Rice Research, Agricultural Research Institute, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Hyderabad -500030, India.

Vidya Sagar B

Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Hyderabad, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The ecological consequences of aerial pesticide application by drones on soil microbiota in rice fields were investigated in this study. The quantitative and qualitative effects of different pesticide treatments, both applied via drones and power sprayer, were examined on soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi. The average population of total bacteria and pseudomonas in the rhizosphere soil tended to be slightly higher in the drone-sprayed treatments compared to the power sprayer treatments. It is evident that the drone spraying treatments resulted in higher average populations of actinomycetes and fungi (124.75 CFU × 105 g-1 soil and 21.12 CFU × 104 g-1 soil, respectively) compared to the power sprayer treatments with average populations of 127.75 CFU × 105 g-1 soil for actinomycetes and 22.5 CFU ×104 g-1 soil for fungi. Qualitative assessment of microbial groups revealed that, the abundance of G -ve bacterial groups are higher when compared to G +ve bacterial groups in rhizospheric soil before harvest of the crop. The distribution of fungal genera varied due to pesticide applications. The mean per cent occurrence of Curvularia spp., Penicillium spp., and Trichoderma spp. was slightly higher in the drone-sprayed treatments (9.85%, 8.51%, and 8.33%) compared to the power-sprayed treatments (2.48%, 2.24%, and 2.00%). However, the mean per cent occurrence of Aspergillus species (A. ochraceous, A. niger, and A. flavus) was relatively higher in the power sprayer treatments (9.14%, 12.81%, and 4.09%) when compared to the drone-sprayed treatments (3.75%, 2.31%, and 0.83%). Overall, this study underscores the need for further research to comprehensively understand the implications of different pesticide application methods on soil microbial communities and their potential impact on soil fertility and ecosystem functioning over time.

Keywords: Aerial pesticide application, soil microbial communities, ecological consequences, soil health


How to Cite

Ragiman, S., Talluri, K. B., NRG, V., & Sagar B, V. (2024). Unveiling the Ecological Ramifications of Aerial Pesticide Application by Drones on Soil Microbiota in Rice. Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 46(6), 250–265. https://doi.org/10.9734/jeai/2024/v46i62475

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Joko T, Anggoro S, Sunoko HR, Rachmawati S. Pesticides usage in the soil quality degradation potential in Wanasari Subdistrict, Brebes, Indonesia. Applied and Environmental Soil Science. 2017;78(2): 185-189.

Borowik A, Wyszkowska J, Kucharski J. Microbiological study in petrol-spiked soil. Molecules. 2021;26(9):2664.

Lyu T, Zhang L, Xu X, Arias CA, Brix H, Carvalho PN. Removal of the pesticide tebuconazole in constructed wetlands: Design comparison, influencing factors and modelling. Environmental Pollution. 2018; 233(1):71-80.

Onwana M, Hogarh JN, Van den Brink PJ. Environmental risk assessment of pesticides currently applied in Ghana. Chemosphere. 2020;254:126845.

Romero E, Delgado-Moreno, L. and Nogales, R.. Pesticide dissipation and enzyme activities in ungrassed and grassed biomixtures, composed of winery wastes, used in biobed bioremediation systems. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution. 2019; 230(2):1-11.

Varma NRG, Babu TK, Ramprasad B, Ashwini D, Reddy TR, Sudhakar C, Omprakash S, Balram N, Divyarani V, Shaila O, Madhuri G, Jagadeeshwar R and Rao VP. Autonomous drones in agriculture: standard operating protocols for agrochemical application in field crops. University Press, PJTSAU, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, Telangana State, India. 2022;16

Atlas RM, Pramer D, Bartha R. Assessment of pesticide effects on non-target soil microorganisms. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 1978;10(3):231-23.

Das AC, Chakravarty A, Sukul P, Mukherjee D. Influence and persistence of phorate and carbofuran insecticides on microorganisms in rice field. Chemosphere. 2003;53(8):1033-1037.

Lacy GH, Lukezic FL. Laboratory exercises for plant pathogenic bacteria. Plant Pathology, Concepts and Laboratory Exercises. 2004;13(4):53-60.

Dong WY, Zhang XY, Dai XQ, Fu XL, Yang FT, Liu XY, Sun XM, Wen XF, Schaeffer S. Changes in soil microbial community composition in response to fertilization of paddy soils in subtropical China. Applied Soil Ecology. 2014;84(1): 140-147.

Gomez KA, Gomez AA. Statistical procedures for agricultural research. John wiley & Sons. 1984;564.

Rahman MM, Khanom A, Biswas SK. Effect of pesticides and chemical fertilizers on the nitrogen cycle and functional microbial communities in paddy soils: Bangladesh perspective. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 2021;106(1):243-249.

Endo T, Taiki K, Nobutsura T, Michihiko S. Effect of the insecticide cartap hydrochloride on soil microflora. Journal of Pesticide Science. 1982;7(1):1-7.

Roman DL, Voiculescu DI, Filip M, Ostafe V, Isvoran A. Effects of triazole fungicides on soil microbiota and on the activities of enzymes found in soil. Agricultural Reviews. 2021;11(9):893-898.

Bacmaga M, Wyszkowska J, Borowik A, Kucharski J. Effects of tebuconazole application on soil microbiota and enzymes. Molecules. 2022;27(21):7501-7506.